Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 449508
Title Infectious disease agents mediate interaction in food webs and ecosystems
Author(s) Selakovic, S.; Ruiter, P.C. de; Heesterbeek, J.A.P.
Source Proceedings of the Royal Society. B: Biological Sciences 281 (2014)1777. - ISSN 0962-8452 - 11 p.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2013.2709
Department(s) Biometris (WU MAT)
PE&RC
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2014
Keyword(s) biological-control - population-dynamics - species-diversity - mustela-nigripes - canine-distemper - african lions - host behavior - coral-reef - parasites - communities
Abstract Infectious agents are part of food webs and ecosystems via the relationship with their host species that, in turn, interact with both hosts and non-hosts. Through these interactions, infectious agents influence food webs in terms of structure, functioning and stability. The present literature shows a broad range of impacts of infectious agents on food webs, and by cataloguing that range, we worked towards defining the various mechanisms and their specific effects. To explore the impact, a direct approach is to study changes in food-web properties with infectious agents as separate species in the web, acting as additional nodes, with links to their host species. An indirect approach concentrates not on adding new nodes and links, but on the ways that infectious agents affect the existing links across host and non-host nodes, by influencing the 'quality' of consumer-resource interaction as it depends on the epidemiological state host involved. Both approaches are natural from an ecological point of view, but the indirect approach may connect more straightforwardly to commonly used tools in infectious disease dynamics.
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