Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 450530
Title Porcine colonization of the Americas: a 60k SNP story
Author(s) Burgos-Paz, W.; Souza, C.; Megens, H.J.W.C.; Ramayo-Caldas, Y.; Crooijmans, R.P.M.A.; Groenen, M.
Source Heredity 110 (2013)4. - ISSN 0018-067X - p. 321 - 330.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1038/hdy.2012.109
Department(s) Animal Breeding and Genetics
WIAS
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2013
Keyword(s) high-altitude - pig breeds - r-package - selection - genome - adaptation - footprints - domestication - association - expression
Abstract The pig, Sus scrofa, is a foreign species to the American continent. Although pigs originally introduced in the Americas should be related to those from the Iberian Peninsula and Canary islands, the phylogeny of current creole pigs that now populate the continent is likely to be very complex. Because of the extreme climates that America harbors, these populations also provide a unique example of a fast evolutionary phenomenon of adaptation. Here, we provide a genome wide study of these issues by genotyping, with a 60k SNP chip, 206 village pigs sampled across 14 countries and 183 pigs from outgroup breeds that are potential founders of the American populations, including wild boar, Iberian, international and Chinese breeds. Results show that American village pigs are primarily of European ancestry, although the observed genetic landscape is that of a complex conglomerate. There was no correlation between genetic and geographical distances, neither continent wide nor when analyzing specific areas. Most populations showed a clear admixed structure where the Iberian pig was not necessarily the main component, illustrating how international breeds, but also Chinese pigs, have contributed to extant genetic composition of American village pigs. We also observe that many genes related to the cardiovascular system show an increased differentiation between altiplano and genetically related pigs living near sea level.
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