Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 455319
Title High dietary protein intake, reducing or eliciting insulin resistance?
Author(s) Rietman, A.; Schwarz, J.; Tome, D.; Kok, F.J.; Mensink, M.R.
Source European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 68 (2014). - ISSN 0954-3007 - p. 973 - 979.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1038/ejcn.2014.123
Department(s) Chair Nutrition and Health over the Lifecourse
Chair Nutrition Metabolism and Genomics
VLAG
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2014
Keyword(s) metabolic risk-factors - low-carbohydrate-diet - blood-glucose control - chain amino-acids - weight-loss diet - low-fat diets - skeletal-muscle - body-composition - glycemic control - mammalian target
Abstract Dietary proteins have an insulinotropic effect and thus promote insulin secretion, which indeed leads to enhanced glucose clearance from the blood. In the long term, however, a high dietary protein intake is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. Moreover, branched-chain amino acids (BCAA), a prominent group of amino acids, were recently identified to be associated with diabetes. Observational data and intervention studies do not point in the same direction regarding the effect of protein intake on insulin sensitivity and diabetes risk. Therefore, the first aim of this review will be to discuss human studies addressing high dietary protein intake and insulin action, with special attention for BCAA. In the second part, we will highlight the (patho) physiological consequences of high-protein diets regarding insulin action, in particular the role of the mechanistic target of the rapamycin pathway.
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