Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Record number 455323
Title Data-based perfect-deficit approach to understanding climate extremes and forest carbon assimilation capacity
Author(s) Wei, S.; Yi, C.; Hendrey, G.; Eaton, T.; Rustic, G.; Wang, S.; Liu, H.; Krakauer, N.Y.; Wang, W.; Desai, A.R.; Moors, E.J.
Source Environmental Research Letters 9 (2014). - ISSN 1748-9326
DOI https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/9/6/065002
Department(s) Alterra - Climate change and adaptive land and water management
WIMEK
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2014
Keyword(s) net ecosystem exchange - drought - respiration - algorithm - heat - reduction - feedbacks - model
Abstract Several lines of evidence suggest that the warming climate plays a vital role in driving certain types of extreme weather. The impact of warming and of extreme weather on forest carbon assimilation capacity is poorly known. Filling this knowledge gap is critical towards understanding the amount of carbon that forests can hold. Here, we used a perfect-deficit approach to identify forest canopy photosynthetic capacity (CPC) deficits and analyze how they correlate to climate extremes, based on observational data measured by the eddy covariance method at 27 forest sites over 146 site-years. We found that droughts severely affect the carbon assimilation capacities of evergreen broadleaf forest (EBF) and deciduous broadleaf forest. The carbon assimilation capacities of Mediterranean forests were highly sensitive to climate extremes, while marine forest climates tended to be insensitive to climate extremes. Our estimates suggest an average global reduction of forest CPC due to unfavorable climate extremes of 6.3 Pg C (~5.2% of global gross primary production) per growing season over 2001–2010, with EBFs contributing 52% of the total reduction.
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