Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 456077
Title Preventing Campylobacter at the Source: Why Is It So Difficult?
Author(s) Wagenaar, J.A.; French, N.P.; Havelaar, A.H.
Source Clinical infectious diseases 57 (2013)11. - ISSN 1058-4838 - p. 1600 - 1606.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1093/cid/cit555
Department(s) CVI Infection Biology
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2013
Keyword(s) united-states - new-zealand - disease burden - broiler meat - vertical transmission - foodborne pathogens - source attribution - risk-assessment - poultry - spp.
Abstract Campylobacteriosis in humans, caused by Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli, is the most common recognized bacterial zoonosis in the European Union and the United States. The acute phase is characterized by gastrointestinal symptoms. The long-term sequelae (Guillain-Barre syndrome, reactive arthritis, and postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome) contribute considerably to the disease burden. Attribution studies identified poultry as the reservoir responsible for up to 80% of the human Campylobacter infections. In the European Union, an estimated 30% of the human infections are associated with consumption and preparation of poultry meat. Until now, interventions in the poultry meat production chain have not been effectively introduced except for targeted interventions in Iceland and New Zealand. Intervention measures (eg, biosecurity) have limited effect or are hampered by economic aspects or consumer acceptance. In the future, a multilevel approach should be followed, aiming at reducing the level of contamination of consumer products rather than complete absence of Campylobacter.
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