Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 456388
Title Lipid oxidation promotes acrylamide formation in fat-rich model systems
Author(s) Capuano, E.; Oliviero, T.; Açar, Ö.; Gökmen, V.; Fogliano, V.
Source Food Research International 43 (2010)4. - ISSN 0963-9969 - p. 1021 - 1026.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodres.2010.01.013
Department(s) RIKILT - BU Authenticity & Nutrients
Food Quality and Design
VLAG
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2010
Keyword(s) maillard reaction - phenylalanine - antioxidant - products - foods - oils
Abstract Lipid oxidation is one of the major chemical reactions occurring during food processing or storage and may have a strong impact on the final quality of foods. A significant role of carbonyl compounds derived from lipid oxidation in acrylamide formation has been recently proposed. In this work, the effect of lipid oxidation level on acrylamide formation was investigated by thermal treatment of differently formulated fat-rich model systems. Results showed that lipid oxidation positively influenced the formation of acrylamide. The effect was more evident in sugar-free system where lipid become the main sources of carbonyls. Catechins reduced acrylamide formation presumably by trapping carbohydrates and/or preventing lipid oxidation. More acrylamide was formed in model systems composed with sunflower oil than in those containing palm oil which is less susceptible to oxidation. In systems containing higher amount of water, acrylamide formation was delayed due to evaporative cooling. In these systems, the effect of catechin was more pronounced and the effect of lipid oxidation became detectable only after a prolonged reaction time. These findings suggested that lipid oxidation could become a relevant factor for acrylamide formation, particularly for dry foods with low carbohydrate content.
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