Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 476891
Title Coral calcification under daily oxygen saturation and pH dynamics reveals the important role of oxygen
Author(s) Wijgerde, T.H.M.; Silva, C.I.F.; Scherders, V.; Bleijswijk, J. van; Osinga, R.
Source Biology Open 3 (2014)6. - ISSN 2046-6390 - p. 489 - 493.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/bio.20147922
Department(s) Aquaculture and Fisheries
WIAS
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2014
Keyword(s) galaxea-fascicularis - scleractinian corals - carbonate chemistry - ocean acidification - photosynthesis - reefs - light - respiration - ecosystems - impacts
Abstract Coral reefs are essential to many nations, and are currently in global decline. Although climate models predict decreases in seawater pH (~0.3 units) and oxygen saturation (~5 percentage points), these are exceeded by the current daily pH and oxygen fluctuations on many reefs (pH 7.8-8.7 and 27-241% O2 saturation). We investigated the effect of oxygen and pH fluctuations on coral calcification in the laboratory using the model species Acropora millepora. Light calcification rates were greatly enhanced (+178%) by increased seawater pH, but only at normoxia; hyperoxia completely negated this positive effect. Dark calcification rates were significantly inhibited (51-75%) at hypoxia, whereas pH had no effect. Our preliminary results suggest that within the current oxygen and pH range, oxygen has substantial control over coral growth, whereas the role of pH is limited. This has implications for reef formation in this era of rapid climate change, which is accompanied by a decrease in seawater oxygen saturation owing to higher water temperatures and coastal eutrophication.
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