Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 483558
Title Modeling of eating style and its effect on intake
Author(s) Boer, J.H.W. van den; Mars, M.
Source Appetite 86 (2015). - ISSN 0195-6663 - p. 25 - 30.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2014.08.032
Department(s) Chair Sensory Science and Eating Behaviour
Chair Nutrition and Health over the Lifecourse
VLAG
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2015
Keyword(s) food-intake - social facilitation - behavior - humans - perception - duration - power - size
Abstract Observational research has indicated that modeling of eating style might occur when eating in the presence of an eating companion. This experiment investigated the effect of bite frequency of a same-sex eating companion on bite frequency, meal size and meal duration. A total of 30 normal weight young adults (m/f¿=¿8/22, age: 21.2¿±¿1.9¿years, BMI: 21.2¿±¿1.6¿kg/m2) had three ad libitum meals together with a same-sex confederate (i.e. instructed eating companion). Confederates were instructed to eat at a slow (3¿bites/min), medium (5¿bites/min) or fast (7¿bites/min) bite frequency in randomized order. Eating style was assessed through video registration and weighing left-overs. It was found that the participants' bite frequency was similar during all three conditions, i.e. slow: 3.9¿±¿1.3, medium: 4.0¿±¿1.1, fast: 4.0¿±¿1.3¿bites/min (p¿=¿0.75), as was average bite size (11¿±¿2.6¿g). Time eaten of the participants was shorter in the medium (14.9¿±¿3.6¿min) and fast condition (14.4¿±¿3.7¿min) compared to the slow condition (16.8¿±¿4.8¿min) (post hoc in both cases p¿
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