Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 491204
Title Monitoring protein capsid assembly with a conjugated polymer strain sensor
Author(s) Cingil, E.H.; Storm, I.M.; Yorulmaz, Y.; Brake, D.W. te; Vries, R.J. de; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Sprakel, J.H.B.
Source Journal of the American Chemical Society 137 (2015)31. - ISSN 0002-7863 - p. 9800 - 9803.
Department(s) Physical Chemistry and Soft Matter
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2015
Keyword(s) beta-phase formation - polyfluorene - poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene) - morphology - photophysics - copolymers - molecules - dynamics - length
Abstract Semiconducting polymers owe their optoelectronic properties to the delocalized electronic structure along their conjugated backbone. Their spectral features are therefore uniquely sensitive to the conformation of the polymer, where mechanical stretching of the chain leads to distinct vibronic shifts. Here we demonstrate how the optomechanical response of conjugated polyelectrolytes can be used to detect their encapsulation in a protein capsid. Coating of the sensor polymers by recombinant coat proteins induces their stretching due to steric hindrance between the proteins. The resulting mechanical planarizations lead to pronounced shifts in the vibronic spectra, from which the process of capsid formation can be directly quantified. These results show how the coupling between vibronic states and mechanical stresses inherent to conjugated polymers can be used to noninvasively measure strains at the nanoscale.
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