Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 494787
Title Aesthetic creation theory and landscape architecture
Author(s) Etteger, Rudi Van; Thompson, I.H.; Vicenzotti, Vera
Source Jola : Journal of Landscape Architecture 11 (2016)1. - ISSN 1862-6033 - p. 80 - 91.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/18626033.2016.1144688
Department(s) Landscape Architecture
WIMEK
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2016
Keyword(s) Aesthetic Creation Theory - criticism - landscape architecture - philosophical aesthetics - theory
Abstract

In recent decades the landscape architectural discourse has tended to eschew ideas of aesthetics while focusing instead on notions of functional and sustainable design. We offer the view that Aesthetic Creation Theory, whose principal exponent is the philosopher Nick Zangwill, has the potential to redress this imbalance by interpreting landscape architecture as art. Zangwill's account of art differs, however, from many other definitions found in philosophical aesthetics: it holds that works of art have aesthetic functions that are essential to them, but also allows that they have other, non-aesthetic functions, for example practical or ecological ones. It thus removes the strict distinction between fine art and the useful arts. After introducing Zangwill's theory, we discuss some rival theories of art and then explore the virtues of Aesthetic Creation Theory for the theory, practice, and pedagogy of landscape architecture.

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