Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 496057
Title New loci for body fat percentage reveal link between adiposity and cardiometabolic disease risk
Author(s) Lu, Y.; Groot, C.P.G.M. de; Dhonukshe-Rutten, R.A.M.
Source Nature Communications 7 (2016). - ISSN 2041-1723 - 15 p.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms10495
Department(s) Human Nutrition (HNE)
Chair Nutrition and Disease
Chair Nutrition and Health over the Lifecourse
VLAG
CS OnderwijsinstituutOnderwijsinstituut
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2016
Abstract To increase our understanding of the genetic basis of adiposity and its links to cardiometabolic disease risk, we conducted a genome-wide association meta-analysis of body fat percentage (BF%) in up to 100,716 individuals. Twelve loci reached genome-wide significance (P<5 × 10−8), of which eight were previously associated with increased overall adiposity (BMI, BF%) and four (in or near COBLL1/GRB14, IGF2BP1, PLA2G6, CRTC1) were novel associations with BF%. Seven loci showed a larger effect on BF% than on BMI, suggestive of a primary association with adiposity, while five loci showed larger effects on BMI than on BF%, suggesting association with both fat and lean mass. In particular, the loci more strongly associated with BF% showed distinct cross-phenotype association signatures with a range of cardiometabolic traits revealing new insights in the link between adiposity and disease risk.
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