Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Record number 496244
Title Does information on landscape benefits influence collective action in landscape governance?
Author(s) Opdam, Paul; Coninx, Ingrid; Dewulf, Art; Steingröver, Eveliene; Vos, Claire; Wal, Merel van der
Source Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability 18 (2016). - ISSN 1877-3435 - p. 107 - 114.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cosust.2015.12.006
Department(s) Land Use Planning
Alterra - Nature and society
WIMEK
Alterra - Regional development and spatial use
Public Administration and Policy
WASS
Plant Production Systems
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2016
Abstract

There is general understanding that collaboration is a key element in the governance for a sustainable environment. In this context knowledge utilization has become a popular research topic. However, the role of information content in enhancing collaboration has been rarely addressed. We consider two types of information on mutual dependencies between actors that result from ecological interdependencies in the landscape: information on landscape sites providing multiple benefits to a range of stakeholders, and information on how these benefits depend on coordinated landscape-level management. Our survey of recent literature indicates that although there is a sound theoretical basis for the assumption that such information would enhance collaboration, the issue has been the subject of little empirical research thus far. We found some supporting studies demonstrating social network building and collective action, but none of them separated the effect of the information content from the effect of the organized social learning process. To increase understanding of the potential for informational governance of landscapes resources, we argue there is a need to integrate recent advances in the analysis of social network building in environmental management with emerging insights in knowledge utilization and spatial interdependencies of landscape benefits.

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