Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 496827
Title Oil spill dispersants induce formation of marine snow by phytoplankton-associated bacteria
Author(s) Eenennaam, J.S. van; Wei, Yuzhu; Grolle, K.C.F.; Foekema, E.M.; Murk, A.J.
Source Marine Pollution Bulletin 104 (2016)1-2. - ISSN 0025-326X - p. 294 - 302.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2016.01.005
Department(s) Sub-department of Environmental Technology
IMARES Maritiem
Marine Animal Ecology
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2016
Keyword(s) Deepwater horizon - Dispersants - Extracellular polymeric substances - Marine phytoplankton - Marine snow - Symbiotic bacteria
Abstract

Unusually large amounts of marine snow, including Extracellular Polymeric Substances (EPS), were formed during the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The marine snow settled with oil and clay minerals as an oily sludge layer on the deep sea floor. This study tested the hypothesis that the unprecedented amount of chemical dispersants applied during high phytoplankton densities in the Gulf of Mexico induced high EPS formation. Two marine phytoplankton species (Dunaliella tertiolecta and Phaeodactylum tricornutum) produced EPS within days when exposed to the dispersant Corexit 9500. Phytoplankton-associated bacteria were shown to be responsible for the formation. The EPS consisted of proteins and to lesser extent polysaccharides. This study reveals an unexpected consequence of the presence of phytoplankton. This emphasizes the need to test the action of dispersants under realistic field conditions, which may seriously alter the fate of oil in the environment via increased marine snow formation.

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