Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 497073
Title The weak link in waste management in tropical Asia? Solid waste collection in Bali
Author(s) MacRae, Graeme; Rodic-Wiersma, Ljiljana
Source Habitat International 50 (2015). - ISSN 0197-3975 - p. 310 - 316.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.habitatint.2015.09.002
Department(s) Education and Competence Studies
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2015
Keyword(s) Asia - Bali - Indonesia - Small towns - Socio-cultural factors - Solid waste management - Waste collection
Abstract

This article builds on earlier work that examined waste processing options on the island of Bali, which can be seen as a useful "laboratory" for the study of solid waste management (SWM) problems and solutions in tropical Asia. The research reported here examines the challenges of waste collection, the component of SWM systems where public awareness and household waste management begin, but which are often a weak link in waste management chains. Moreover, it focuses on small towns and the specific problems they face, which are different from those in large cities that usually receive more political (and scientific) attention. The article consists of ethnographic accounts of waste collection and disposal initiatives in several small towns on the island, intended to cast light on the complex local political, economic and other socio-cultural realities that ultimately determine the success or failure of waste collection as a public utility service. Our evidence suggests a need for more attention to the collection end of the waste handling process and to the local socio-cultural factors that "make or break" waste management systems.

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