Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 497765
Title The Elders' Measures : Barter, Value and Kinship in the Argentinean Andes
Author(s) Angé, Olivia
Source Journal of Latin American and Caribbean Anthropology 20 (2015)2. - ISSN 1935-4932 - p. 359 - 378.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jlca.12152
Department(s) Sociology of Development and Change
WASS
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2015
Keyword(s) Andes - Barter - Ethnicity - Identity - Value
Abstract

Drawing on ethnographic data from north Argentina, this text examines an Andean figure of barter called cambio. In contrast with other kinds of direct exchanges, cambio alludes to an archetypal transaction of agricultural products, framed by normative prescriptions that are said to be inherited from the ancestors. The examination of cambio shows that the theory of value posited by its partakers constitutes a fundamental feature for understanding barter peculiarities, and in particular, its social performativity. The article argues that barter is not simply embedded within previous social networks. It further participates in the constitution of new kinds of relationships. In cambio, these ties are conceived in the idiom of kinship, which fixes identities in a dynamic ethnic configuration. In its all, this work enlightens how groups create themselves through economic exchanges and the importance of barter in this process; an aspect that has been underestimated in the literature, where such social operation remains chiefly attributed to gift-giving.

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