Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 497807
Title Individual specialization on fishery discards by lesser black-backed gulls (Larus fuscus)
Author(s) Tyson, Chris; Shamoun-Baranes, Judy; Loon, E.E. Van; Camphuysen, K.C.J.; Hintzen, N.T.
Source ICES Journal of Marine Science 72 (2015)6. - ISSN 1054-3139 - p. 1882 - 1891.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/icesjms/fsv021
Department(s) IMARES Visserij
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2015
Keyword(s) fishery discards - GPS tracking - individual specialization - Larus fuscus - lesser black-backed gull
Abstract

While seabird-fishery associations are well documented, this research primarily comes from ship-based surveys and consequently individual level responses to discard availability are largely unknown. As part of a long-term study on lesser black-backed gulls (Larus fuscus) in the Netherlands, the fine-scale movements of adults were tracked with GPS tags throughout the breeding period. The aim of this study was to determine if lesser black-backed gulls were utilizing fishery discards in the Wadden Sea and to examine possible consequences of this behaviour. Within the Wadden Sea during weekdays, tracked birds predominately associated with zones where fishing vessels are known to operate (deep gullies). Across all individuals combined (n = 40), there was a significantly reduced use of the Wadden Sea during weekends when the fleets were not operating. Eight females, who markedly increased their use of the Wadden Sea during weekdays throughout the breeding period, were largely responsible for this pattern. The loss of discard resources on weekends primarily resulted in these eight individuals switching to terrestrial foraging areas. Nest attendance and total foraging time were consistent between weekdays and weekends, suggesting that resource shifts on weekends did not impact daily time budgets. As such, it appears that lesser black-backed gulls specializing on discard utilization are able to flexibly respond to the temporary loss of discards by switching to alternative resources.

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