Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 497833
Title Are effects of common ragwort in the Ames test caused by pyrrolizidine alkaloids?
Author(s) Bovee, T.F.H.; Helsdingen, R.J.R.; Hoogenboom, R.L.A.P.; Nijs, M.W.C.M. de; Liu, Xiaojie; Vrieling, Klaas; Klinkhamer, P.G.L.; Peijnenburg, A.A.C.M.; Mulder, P.P.J.
Source Mutation Research. Fundamental and Molecular Mechanisms of Mutagenesis 778 (2015). - ISSN 0027-5107 - p. 1 - 10.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mrfmmm.2015.05.006
Department(s) RIKILT - BU Toxicology Bioassays & Novel Foods
RIKILT
VLAG
RIKILT - Business unit Contaminants & Toxins
RIKILT - R&C Natuurlijke Toxinen en Pesticiden
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2015
Keyword(s) Ames test - LC-MS/MS - Pyrrolizidine alkaloids - Quercetin - Ragwort
Abstract

It has previously been demonstrated by others that acetone extracts of Senecio jacobaea (syn. Jacobaea vulgaris, common or tansy ragwort) test positive in the Salmonella/microsome mutagenicity test (Ames test). Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) are thought to be responsible for these mutagenic effects. However, it was also observed that the major PA present in common ragwort, jacobine, produced a negative response (with and without the addition of rat liver S9) in Salmonella test strains TA98, TA100, TA1535 and TA1537. To investigate which compounds in the plant extracts were responsible for the positive outcome, the present study investigated the contents and mutagenic effects of methanol and acetone extracts prepared from dried ground S. jacobaea and Senecio inaequidens (narrow-leafed ragwort). Subsequently, a fractionation approach was set up in combination with LC-MS/MS analysis of the fractions. It was shown that the positive Ames test outcomes of S. jacobaea extracts are unlikely to be caused by PAs, but rather by the flavonoid quercetin. This study also demonstrates the importance of identifying compounds responsible for positive test results in bioassays.

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