Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 497888
Title Sensory quality of drinking water produced by reverse osmosis membrane filtration followed by remineralisation
Author(s) Vingerhoeds, M.H.; Nijenhuis, M.A.; Ruepert, N.; Bredie, W.L.P.; Kremer, S.
Source Water Research 94 (2016). - ISSN 0043-1354 - p. 42 - 51.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.watres.2016.02.043
Department(s) FBR Consumer Science & Health
VLAG
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2016
Keyword(s) drinking water - water quality - sensory evaluation - taste research - reverse osmosis - membranes - filtration - drinkwater - waterkwaliteit - sensorische evaluatie - smaakonderzoek - omgekeerde osmose - membranen - filtratie
Categories Water Supply
Abstract Membrane filtration of ground, surface, or sea water by reverse osmosis results in permeate, which is almost free from minerals. Minerals may be added afterwards, not only to comply with (legal) standards and to enhance chemical stability, but also to improve the taste of drinking water made from permeate. Both the nature and the concentrations of added minerals affect the taste of the water and in turn its acceptance by consumers. The aim of this study was to examine differences in taste between various remineralised drinking waters. Samples selected varied in mineral composition, i.e. tap water, permeate, and permeate with added minerals (40 or 120 mg Ca/L, added as CaCO3, and 4 or 24 mg Mg/L added as MgCl2), as well as commercially available bottled drinking waters, to span a relevant product space in which the remineralised samples could be compared. All samples were analysed with respect to their physical–chemical properties. Sensory profiling was done by descriptive analysis using a trained panel. Significant attributes included taste intensity, the tastes bitter, sweet, salt, metal, fresh and dry mouthfeel, bitter and metal aftertaste, and rough afterfeel. Total dissolved solids (TDS) was a major determinant of the taste perception of water. In general, lowering mineral content in drinking water in the range examined (from <5 to 440 mg/L) shifted the sensory perception of water from fresh towards bitter, dry, and rough sensations. In addition, perceived freshness of the waters correlated positively with calcium concentration. The greatest fresh taste was found for water with a TDS between 190 and 350 mg/L. Remineralisation of water after reverse osmosis can improve drinking quality significantly.
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