Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 498301
Title Endogenous processes of colonial settlement. the success and failure of european settler farming in sub-saharan africa
Author(s) Frankema, Ewout; Green, Erik; Hillbom, Ellen
Source Revista de Historia Economica - Journal of Iberian and Latin American Economic History 34 (2016)2. - ISSN 0212-6109 - p. 237 - 265.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0212610915000397
Department(s) Rural and Environmental History
WASS
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2016
Keyword(s) cash-crop production - colonial history - settler farming - Sub-Saharan Africa
Abstract

This paper comments on studies that aim to quantify the long-term economic effects of historical European settlement across the globe. We argue for the need to properly conceptualise «colonial settlement» as an endogenous development process shaped by the interaction between prospective settlers and indigenous peoples. We conduct three comparative case studies in West, East and Southern Africa, showing that the «success» or «failure» of colonial settlement critically depended on colonial government policies arranging European farmer’s access to local land, but above all, local labour resources. These policies were shaped by the clashing interests of African farmers and European planters, in which colonial governments did not necessarily, and certainly not consistently, abide to settler demands, as is often assumed.

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