Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 498664
Title Assessing the inequality of lifetime healthcare expenditures : a nearest neighbour resampling approach
Author(s) Wong, Albert; Boshuizen, Hendriek; Polder, Johan; Ferreira, José António
Source Journal of the Royal Statistical Society. Series A, Statistics in Society 180 (2017)1. - ISSN 0964-1998 - p. 141 - 180.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/rssa.12184
Department(s) Human Nutrition (HNE)
VLAG
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2017
Keyword(s) Healthcare expenditures - Healthcare systems - Inequality - Inequity - Life cycles - Nearest neighbour resampling - Non-parametric methods - Simulation
Abstract

The rise in healthcare expenditures has raised doubts about the sustainability of health systems and instigated a discussion on their design. Policy making in this field requires a proper understanding of how healthcare expenditures evolve throughout an individual's lifetime, and of how they vary between individuals. Given the lack of data on healthcare expenditures during an individual's lifetime, we developed a new nearest neighbour resampling approach to construct realistic individual life cycles of healthcare expenditures based on cross-sectional data from the Netherlands. This approach provides insight into lifetime healthcare expenditures. Our main finding is that the inequality in lifetime healthcare expenditures is much smaller than the inequality as derived from cross-sectional healthcare expenditures.

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