Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Record number 498696
Title Suitability of analytical methods to measure solubility for the purpose of nanoregulation
Author(s) Tantra, Ratna; Bouwmeester, Hans; Bolea, Eduardo; Rey-Castro, Carlos; David, Calin A.; Dogné, Jean Michel; Jarman, John; Laborda, Francisco; Laloy, Julie; Robinson, Kenneth N.; Undas, Anna K.; Zande, Meike Van Der
Source Nanotoxicology 10 (2016)2. - ISSN 1743-5390 - p. 173 - 184.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/17435390.2015.1038661
Department(s) RIKILT - BU Toxicology Bioassays & Novel Foods
VLAG
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2016
Keyword(s) Nanomaterials - regulation - solubility
Abstract

Solubility is an important physicochemical parameter in nanoregulation. If nanomaterial is completely soluble, then from a risk assessment point of view, its disposal can be treated much in the same way as "ordinary" chemicals, which will simplify testing and characterisation regimes. This review assesses potential techniques for the measurement of nanomaterial solubility and evaluates the performance against a set of analytical criteria (based on satisfying the requirements as governed by the cosmetic regulation as well as the need to quantify the concentration of free (hydrated) ions). Our findings show that no universal method exists. A complementary approach is thus recommended, to comprise an atomic spectrometry-based method in conjunction with an electrochemical (or colorimetric) method. This article shows that although some techniques are more commonly used than others, a huge research gap remains, related with the need to ensure data reliability.

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