Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 498912
Title Impact of soil heat on reassembly of bacterial communities in the rhizosphere microbiome and plant disease suppression
Author(s) Voort, M. van der; Kempenaar, Marcel; Driel, Marc van; Raaijmakers, Jos M.; Mendes, Rodrigo
Source Ecology Letters 19 (2016)4. - ISSN 1461-023X - p. 375 - 382.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ele.12567
Department(s) Laboratory of Phytopathology
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2016
Keyword(s) Bacterial diversity - Disease-suppressive soils - Disturbance - PhyloProfiler - Rhizosphere - Rhizosphere microbiome
Abstract

The rhizosphere microbiome offers a range of ecosystem services to the plant, including nutrient acquisition and tolerance to (a)biotic stress. Here, analysing the data by Mendes et al. (2011), we show that short heat disturbances (50 or 80 °C, 1 h) of a soil suppressive to the root pathogenic fungus Rhizoctonia solani caused significant increase in alpha diversity of the rhizobacterial community and led to partial or complete loss of disease protection. A reassembly model is proposed where bacterial families that are heat tolerant and have high growth rates significantly increase in relative abundance after heat disturbance, while temperature-sensitive and slow-growing bacteria have a disadvantage. The results also pointed to a potential role of slow-growing, heat-tolerant bacterial families from Actinobacteria and Acidobacteria phyla in plant disease protection. In conclusion, short heat disturbance of soil results in rearrangement of rhizobacterial communities and this is correlated with changes in the ecosystem service disease suppression.

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