Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 503282
Title Farm-level GM Coexistence Policies in the EU : Context, Concepts and Developments
Author(s) Schenkelaars, Piet; Wesseler, Justus
Source EuroChoices 15 (2016)1. - ISSN 1478-0917 - p. 5 - 11.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1746-692X.12112
Department(s) Agricultural Economics and Rural Policy Group
WASS
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2016
Abstract

Many EU MS have implemented coexistence policies to govern the cultivation of GM crops on their territory but only one GM crop, the Bt maize event MON810, is currently cultivated in the EU. From a practical point of view, a combination of paper traceability and implementation of isolation distances between GM and non-GM maize are considered as being the most effective way of segregating both types of materials. In general, infringements will however only become apparent after harvesting the crops. Liability issues will then be invoked late in the process restricting or at least limiting flexibility in the marketing of the materials in an appropriate way. Nevertheless, following the general guidelines for coexistence developed by the European Commission, EU Member States are progressively regulating coexistence at the national level. The policies in the EU governing coexistence can be differentiated into ex-ante regulations and ex-post liability rules. This differentiation is useful as the economic implications between the two differ. With regard to maize, studies show that the costs of complying with the given threshold values for GM content at farm level range from zero to 2 per cent of the total growing costs for both conventional and organic production.

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