Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 505948
Title Selecting appropriate methods of knowledge synthesis to inform biodiversity policy
Author(s) Pullin, Andrew; Frampton, Geoff; Jongman, Rob; Kohl, Christian; Livoreil, Barbara; Lux, Alexandra; Pataki, György; Petrokofsky, Gillian; Podhora, Aranka; Saarikoski, Heli; Santamaria, Luis; Schindler, Stefan; Sousa-pinto, Isabel; Vandewalle, Marie; Wittmer, Heidi
Source Biodiversity and Conservation 25 (2016)7. - ISSN 0960-3115 - p. 1285 - 1300.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10531-016-1131-9
Department(s) Alterra - Biodiversity and policy
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2016
Abstract Responding to different questions generated by biodiversity and ecosystem services policy or management requires different forms of knowledge (e.g. scientific, experiential) and knowledge synthesis. Additionally, synthesis methods need to be appropriate to policy context (e.g. question types, budget, timeframe, output type, required scientific rigour). In this paper we present a range of different methods that could potentially be used to conduct a knowledge synthesis in response to questions arising from knowledge needs of decision makers on biodiversity and ecosystem services policy and management. Through a series of workshops attended by natural and social scientists and decision makers we compiled a range of question types, different policy contexts and potential methodological approaches to knowledge synthesis. Methods are derived from both natural and social sciences fields and reflect the range of question and study types that may be relevant for syntheses. Knowledge can be available either in qualitative or quantitative form and in some cases also mixed. All methods have their strengths and weaknesses and we discuss a sample of these to illustrate the need for diversity and importance of appropriate selection. To summarize this collection, we present a table that identifies potential methods matched to different combinations of question types and policy contexts, aimed at assisting teams undertaking knowledge syntheses to select appropriate methods.
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