Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Record number 506353
Title Does Nilaparvata lugens gain tolerance to rice resistance genes through conspecifics at shared feeding sites?
Author(s) Ferrater, Jedeliza B.; Horgan, Finbarr G.
Source Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata 160 (2016)1. - ISSN 0013-8703 - p. 77 - 82.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/eea.12454
Department(s) Laboratory of Entomology
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2016
Keyword(s) Bph3 gene - brown planthopper - contemporaneous feeding - Delphacidae - facilitation - Hemiptera - host plant resistance - oral secretions - Oryza sativa - Poaceae - rice - 016-3963
Abstract

This study examines the possibility of horizontal and vertical transmission of virulence (the ability to tolerate a given resistant plant or resistance gene) between individuals from brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens (Stål) (Hemiptera: Delphacidae), populations with distinct feeding abilities when their populations share the same feeding sites (virulence acquisition hypothesis). We created optimal conditions for intraspecific interactions on the same rice, Oryza sativa L. (Poaceae), plants between planthoppers from populations with different feeding histories: an ‘avirulent’ population that was continually reared on a susceptible variety, and a ‘virulent’ population that had been selected over several generations on the resistant variety IR62, that possesses the Bph3 gene. We noted that planthoppers attained highest weights on rice plants that had previously been attacked by conspecifics from the IR62-selected population. We also tested the ability of planthoppers to feed on IR62 and the susceptible cv. Taichung Native 1 (TN1) after interacting with individuals from the IR62-selected population on a tolerant rice cultivar (Triveni). Feeding by avirulent planthoppers on both IR62 and TN1 improved after feeding on the same rice plants with virulent planthoppers. Furthermore, the effects were carried over to planthopper progenies. Our preliminary results indicate that feeding by mixed populations that include individuals adapted to feed on resistant varieties potentially accelerates adaptation by N. lugens to rice resistance.

Comments
There are no comments yet. You can post the first one!
Post a comment
 
Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.