Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Record number 506381
Title Production and characterization of stable foams with fine bubbles from solutions of hydrophobin HFBII and its mixtures with other proteins
Author(s) Dimitrova, Lydia M.; Petkov, Plamen V.; Kralchevsky, Peter A.; Stoyanov, Simeon D.; Pelan, Eddie G.
Source Colloids and Surfaces. A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects 521 (2017). - ISSN 0927-7757 - p. 92 - 104.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.colsurfa.2016.06.018
Department(s) Physical Chemistry and Soft Matter
VLAG
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2017
Abstract Hydrophobins are proteins that are excellent foam stabilizers. We investigated the effects of pH and addition of other proteins on the foaminess, bubble size, and stability of foams from aqueous solutions of the protein HFBII hydrophobin. The produced stable foams have bubbles of radii smaller than 40 μm that obey the lognormal distribution. The overrun of most foams is in the range from 5 to 8, which indicates a good foaminess. The foam longevity is characterized by the time dependences of the foam volume and weight. A combined quantitative criterion for stability, the degree of foam conservation, is proposed. The produced foams are stable for at least 12–17 days. The high foam stability can be explained with the formation of dense hydrophobin adsorption layers, which are impermeable to gas transfer and block the Ostwald ripening (foam disproportionation). In addition, the population of small bubbles formed in the HFBII solutions blocks the drainage of water through the Plateau borders in the foam. The variation of pH does not essentially affect the foaminess and foam stability. The addition of “regular” proteins, such as beta-lactoglobulin, ovalbumin and bovine serum albumin, to the HFBII solutions does not deteriorate the quality and stability of the produced foams up to 94% weight fraction of the added protein. The results and conclusions from the present study could be useful for the applications of hydrophobins as foam stabilizers.
Comments
There are no comments yet. You can post the first one!
Post a comment
 
Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.