Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 506725
Title Brain response to images of food varying in energy density is associated with body composition in 7- to 10-year-old children : Results of an exploratory study
Author(s) Fearnbach, S.N.; English, Laural K.; Lasschuijt, Marlou; Wilson, Stephen J.; Savage, Jennifer S.; Fisher, Jennifer O.; Rolls, Barbara J.; Keller, Kathleen L.
Source Physiology and Behavior 162 (2016). - ISSN 0031-9384 - p. 3 - 9.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.physbeh.2016.03.007
Department(s) Chair Sensory Science and Eating Behaviour
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2016
Keyword(s) Body composition - Children - Energy density - Fat-free mass - fMRI - Neuroimaging
Abstract

Energy balance is regulated by a multifaceted system of physiological signals that influence energy intake and expenditure. Therefore, variability in the brain's response to food may be partially explained by differences in levels of metabolically active tissues throughout the body, including fat-free mass (FFM) and fat mass (FM). The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that children's body composition would be related to their brain response to food images varying in energy density (ED), a measure of energy content per weight of food. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to measure brain response to High (> 1.5 kcal/g) and Low (

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