Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 506779
Title Opportunities to improve genetic conservation of four important European tree species - Project brief
Author(s) Kramer, K.; Kärkäinen, Katri
Source European Commission - 4 p.
Department(s) Alterra - Vegetation, forest and landscape ecology
PE&RC
Publication type Brochure
Publication year 2016
Abstract Forest genetic resources (FGR) form the base for adaptation
of European forests to future environmental conditions and
societal demands. Genetic diversity, i.e. diversity withinspecies,
allows a species to evolve over time and in space
and plays a key role for both the long-term survival of a
species and the stability of forest ecosystems. It is thereby a
fundamental and critical part of biodiversity.
Forest genetic resources (FGR) are defined as genetic
material of forest trees that is of actual or potential value
for future generations. Genetic resources are embedded in
forest reproductive material such as seeds, seedlings or other
propagules.
Genetic conservation is defined as any maintenance of
genetic diversity (in situ or ex situ) to secure the future
utilization of the genetic resources. In situ conservation
is a measure taken to conserve tree populations in their
natural environment or in the environment where they have
developed their distinctive properties. Usually, this refers to
designated genetic reserves where the genetic adaptability
of forest tree species is maintained by natural processes.
Conversely, the ex situ conservation of genetic resources
entails all measures including the removal of various kinds
of genetic material (DNA, pollen, seeds, whole trees,
populations), their storage in gene banks or in clonal archives
or so- called ex situ gene reserves, as long as the resource is
considered valuable.
Beech
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