Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 507401
Title Socio-economic Impacts - Fisheries
Author(s) Pinnegar, John K.; Engelhard, G.H.; Jones, M.; Cheung, W.W.L.; Peck, Myron A.; Rijnsdorp, A.D.; Brander, K.
Source In: North Sea Region Climate Change Assessment / Quante, Markus, Colijn, Franciscus, Springer (Regional Climate Studies ) - ISBN 9783319397436 - p. 375 - 395.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-39745-0_12
Department(s) IMARES Onderzoeksformatie
WIAS
Publication type Peer reviewed book chapter
Publication year 2016
Abstract Fishers and scientists have known for over 100 years that the status of fish stocks can be greatly influenced by prevailing climatic conditions. Based on historical sea surface temperature data, the North Sea has been identified as one of 20 ‘hot spots’ of climate change globally and projections for the next 100 years suggest that the region will continue to warm. The consequences of this rapid temperature rise are already being seen in shifts in species distribution and variability in stock recruitment. This chapter reviews current evidence for climate change effects on fisheries in the North Sea—one of the most
important fishing grounds in the world—as well as available projections for North Sea fisheries in the future. Discussion focuses on biological, operational and wider market concerns, as well as on possible economic consequences. It is clear that fish communities and the fisheries that target them will be very different in 50 or 100 years’ time and that management and governance will need to adapt accordingly.
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