Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 507740
Title Should the Lion Eat Straw Like the Ox? Animal Ethics and the Predation Problem
Author(s) Keulartz, Jozef
Source Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics (2016). - ISSN 1187-7863 - 22 p.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/s10806-016-9637-4
Department(s) Philosophy
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2016
Keyword(s) Capability approach - Political theory of animal rights - Predation problem - Rights theories - Utilitarianism
Abstract

Stephen Clark’s article The Rights of Wild Things from 1979 was the starting point for the consideration in the animal ethics literature of the so-called ‘predation problem’. Clark examines the response of David George Ritchie to Henry Stephens Salt, the first writer who has argued explicitly in favor of animal rights. Ritchie attempts to demonstrate—via reductio ad absurdum—that animals cannot have rights, because granting them rights would oblige us to protect prey animals against predators that wrongly violate their rights. This article navigates the reader through the debate sparked off by Clarke’s article, with as final destination what I consider to be the best way to deal with the predation problem. I will successively discuss arguments against the predation reductio from Singer’s utilitarian approach, Regan’s deontological approach, Nussbaum’s capability approach, and Donadson and Kymlicka’s political theory of animal rights.

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