Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Record number 507773
Title Nine things to know about elicitins
Author(s) Derevnina, Lida; Dagdas, Yasin F.; Concepcion, Juan Carlos De la; Bialas, Aleksandra; Kellner, Ronny; Petre, Benjamin; Domazakis, Emmanouil; Du, Juan; Wu, Chih Hang; Lin, Xiao; Aguilera-Galvez, Carolina; Cruz-Mireles, Neftaly; Vleeshouwers, Vivianne G.A.A.; Kamoun, Sophien
Source New Phytologist 212 (2016)4. - ISSN 0028-646X - p. 888 - 895.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/nph.14137
Department(s) Laboratory of Plant Breeding
PBR Biodiversiteit en Genetische Variatie
EPS
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2016
Keyword(s) Cell death - Elicitin response (ELR) - Elicitor - Hypersensitive response (HR) - INF1 - Microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) - Oomycetes
Abstract

Elicitins are structurally conserved extracellular proteins in Phytophthora and Pythium oomycete pathogen species. They were first described in the late 1980s as abundant proteins in Phytophthora culture filtrates that have the capacity to elicit hypersensitive (HR) cell death and disease resistance in tobacco. Later, they became well-established as having features of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) and to elicit defences in a variety of plant species. Research on elicitins culminated in the recent cloning of the elicitin response (ELR) cell surface receptor-like protein, from the wild potato Solanum microdontum, which mediates response to a broad range of elicitins. In this review, we provide an overview on elicitins and the plant responses they elicit. We summarize the state of the art by describing what we consider to be the nine most important features of elicitin biology.

Comments
There are no comments yet. You can post the first one!
Post a comment
 
Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.