Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Record number 508011
Title Climate and human development impacts on municipal water demand : A spatially-explicit global modeling framework
Author(s) Parkinson, Simon C.; Johnson, Nils; Rao, Narasimha D.; Jones, Bryan; Vliet, Michelle T.H. van; Fricko, Oliver; Djilali, Ned; Riahi, Keywan; Flörke, Martina
Source Environmental Modelling & Software 85 (2016). - ISSN 1364-8152 - p. 266 - 278.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envsoft.2016.08.002
Department(s) Earth System Science
WIMEK
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2016
Keyword(s) Climate change impacts - Downscaling - Integrated assessment modeling - Long-term planning - Urbanization - Water demand
Abstract

Municipal water systems provide crucial services for human well-being, and will undergo a major transformation this century following global technological, socioeconomic and environmental changes. Future demand scenarios integrating these drivers over multi-decadal planning horizons are needed to develop effective adaptation strategies. This paper presents a new long-term scenario modeling framework that projects future daily municipal water demand at a 1/8° global spatial resolution. The methodology incorporates improved representations of important demand drivers such as urbanization and climate change. The framework is applied across multiple future socioeconomic and climate scenarios to explore municipal water demand uncertainties over the 21st century. The scenario analysis reveals that achieving a low-carbon development pathway can potentially reduce global municipal water demands in 2060 by 2–4%, although the timing and scale of impacts vary significantly with geographic location.

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