Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 508706
Title Using farmers’ attitude and social pressures to design voluntary Bluetongue vaccination strategies
Author(s) Sok, J.; Hogeveen, H.; Elbers, A.R.W.; Oude Lansink, A.G.J.M.
Source Preventive Veterinary Medicine 133 (2016). - ISSN 0167-5877 - p. 114 - 119.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2016.09.016
Department(s) Business Economics
WASS
CVI Bacteriology and Epidemiology
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2016
Keyword(s) Attitude - Bluetongue - Decision-making - Disease control - Farmers - Policy instruments - Social pressures - Voluntary vaccination
Abstract

Understanding the context and drivers of farmers’ decision-making is critical to designing successful voluntary disease control interventions. This study uses a questionnaire based on the Reasoned Action Approach framework to assess the determinants of farmers’ intention to participate in a hypothetical reactive vaccination scheme against Bluetongue. Results suggest that farmers’ attitude and social pressures best explained intention. A mix of policy instruments can be used in a complementary way to motivate voluntary vaccination based on the finding that participation is influenced by both internal and external motivation. Next to informational and incentive-based instruments, social pressures, which stem from different type of perceived norms, can spur farmers' vaccination behaviour and serve as catalysts in voluntary vaccination schemes.

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