Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 508887
Title Hard-to-cook phenomenon in bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc.) processing : Options to improve its role in providing food security
Author(s) Mubaiwa, Juliet; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Chidewe, Cathrine; Linnemann, Anita R.
Source Food Reviews International 33 (2017)2. - ISSN 8755-9129 - p. 167 - 194.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1080/87559129.2016.1149864
Department(s) Food Quality and Design
VLAG
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2017
Keyword(s) Bambara groundnut - food security - hard-to-cook phenomenon - hard-to-mill phenomenon - processing - sub-Saharan Africa
Abstract

Indigenous legume crops are pivotal in providing proteins and food security to sub-Saharan African rural communities, but most of these crops are underutilized because of the so-called hard-to-cook (HTC) phenomenon in combination with inadequate processing techniques. This review studies the case of bambara groundnut, which is third in importance after groundnut and cowpea and especially adapted to semi-arid areas. Published data on the HTC phenomenon implicate microstructural and compositional changes as factors leading to its development. Useful and sustainable techniques to process HTC legumes in developing countries include cooking with alkaline salts, milling, roasting, fermentation, and malting. Improvement of these processing techniques in relation to nutrient bioaccessibility, safety, and consumer acceptance of the products is urgently needed. Recommendations are to lessen the problems of food security in sub-Saharan African countries through, amongst other means, the optimization of bambara groundnut processing methods.

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