Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Record number 509157
Title Transfer of pyrrolizidine alkaloids from various herbs to eggs and meat in laying hens
Author(s) Mulder, Patrick P.J.; Witte, Susannah L. de; Stoopen, Geert M.; Meulen, Jan van der; Wikselaar, Piet G. van; Gruys, Erik; Groot, Maria J.; Hoogenboom, Ron L.A.P.
Source Food Additives & Contaminants. Pt. A, Chemistry, Analysis, Control, Exposure & Risk Assessment 33 (2016)12. - ISSN 1944-0049 - p. 1826 - 1893.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19440049.2016.1241430
Department(s) RIKILT - Business unit Contaminants & Toxins
VLAG
RIKILT - BU Toxicology Bioassays & Novel Foods
CS Corporate Education, Research & InnovationCorporate Education, Research & Innovation
LR - Animal Nutrition
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2016
Keyword(s) eggs - laying hens - liver - meat - Pyrrolizidine alkaloids - transfer
Abstract

To investigate the potential transfer of pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs), laying hens were fed for 14 days with diets containing 0.5% of dried common ragwort, common groundsel, narrow-leaved ragwort or viper’s bugloss, or 0.1% of common heliotrope. This resulted in total PA levels in feed of respectively 5.5, 11.1, 53.1, 5.9 and 21.7 mg kg 1, with varying composition. PAs were transferred to eggs, in particular yolk, with steady-state levels of respectively 12, 21, 216, 2 and 36 µg kg 1. Overall transfer rates for the sum of PAs were estimated between 0.02% and 0.23%, depending on the type of PAs in the feed. In animals slaughtered shortly after the last exposure, levels in meat were slightly lower than those in eggs, levels in livers somewhat higher. When switched to clean feed, levels in eggs gradually decreased, but after 14 days were still above detection limits in the hens exposed to higher PA levels. Similar was the case for meat and especially kidneys and livers. It is concluded that the intake of PA containing herbs by laying hens may result in levels in eggs and meat that could be of concern for consumers, and as such should be avoided.

Comments
There are no comments yet. You can post the first one!
Post a comment
 
Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.