Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 509957
Title Critically ill patients demonstrate large interpersonal variation in intestinal microbiota dysregulation : a pilot study
Author(s) Lankelma, Jacqueline M.; Vught, Lonneke A. van; Belzer, Clara; Schultz, Marcus J.; Poll, Tom van der; Vos, Willem M. de; Wiersinga, W.J.
Source Intensive Care Medicine 43 (2017)1. - ISSN 0342-4642 - p. 59 - 68.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00134-016-4613-z
Department(s) Microbiological Laboratory
VLAG
WIMEK
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2017
Keyword(s) Antibiotics - Critically ill - Gut microbiota - Intensive care unit - Sepsis
Abstract

Purpose: The intestinal microbiota has emerged as a virtual organ with essential functions in human physiology. Antibiotic-induced disruption of the microbiota in critically ill patients may have a negative influence on key energy resources and immunity. We set out to characterize the fecal microbiota composition in critically ill patients both with and without sepsis and to explore the use of microbiota-derived markers for clinical outcome measurements in this setting. Methods: In this prospective observational cohort study we analyzed the fecal microbiota of 34 patients admitted to the intensive care unit. Fifteen healthy subjects served as controls. The fecal microbiota was phylogenetically characterized by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and associations with clinical outcome parameters were evaluated. Results: A marked shift in fecal bacterial composition was seen in all septic and non-septic critically ill patients compared with controls, with extreme interindividual differences. In 13 of the 34 patients, a single bacterial genus made up >50% of the gut microbiota; in 4 patients this was even >75%. A significant decrease in bacterial diversity was observed in half of the patients. No associations were found between microbiota diversity, Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio, or Gram-positive/Gram-negative ratio and outcome measurements such as complications and survival. Conclusions: We observed highly heterogeneous patterns of intestinal microbiota in both septic and non-septic critically ill patients. Nevertheless, some general patterns were observed, including disappearance of bacterial genera with important functions in host metabolism. More detailed knowledge of the short- and long-term health consequences of these major shifts in intestinal bacterial communities is needed.

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