Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 510365
Title Benefits from living together? Clades whose species use similar habitats may persist as a result of eco-evolutionary feedbacks
Author(s) Prinzing, Andreas; Ozinga, Wim A.; Brändle, Martin; Courty, Pierre Emmanuel; Hennion, Françoise; Labandeira, Conrad; Parisod, Christian; Pihain, Mickael; Bartish, Igor V.
Source New Phytologist 213 (2017)1. - ISSN 0028-646X - p. 66 - 82.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/nph.14341
Department(s) Alterra - Vegetation, forest and landscape ecology
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2017
Keyword(s) assembly of present and fossil communities - competition - conservation biology - enemy pressure and mutualism of coexisting species - evolution and conservatism - hybridization - niche breadth
Abstract

(Table presented.). Summary: Recent decades have seen declines of entire plant clades while other clades persist despite changing environments. We suggest that one reason why some clades persist is that species within these clades use similar habitats, because such similarity may increase the degree of co-occurrence of species within clades. Traditionally, co-occurrence among clade members has been suggested to be disadvantageous because of increased competition and enemy pressure. Here, we hypothesize that increased co-occurrence among clade members promotes mutualist exchange, niche expansion or hybridization, thereby helping species avoid population decline from environmental change. We review the literature and analyse published data for hundreds of plant clades (genera) within a well-studied region and find major differences in the degree to which species within clades occupy similar habitats. We tentatively show that, in clades for which species occupy similar habitats, species tend to exhibit increased co-occurrence, mutualism, niche expansion, and hybridization – and rarely decline. Consistently, throughout the geological past, clades whose species occupied similar habitats often persisted through long time-spans. Overall, for many plant species, the occupation of similar habitats among fellow clade members apparently reduced their vulnerability to environmental change. Future research should identify when and how this previously unrecognized eco-evolutionary feedback operates.

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