Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 510587
Title The prey’s scent – Volatile organic compound mediated interactions between soil bacteria and their protist predators
Author(s) Schulz, K.B.; Geisen, Stefan; Wubs, E.R.J.; Song, C.; Boer, W. de; Garbeva, Paolina
Source ISME Journal 11 (2017). - ISSN 1751-7362 - p. 817 - 820.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1038/ismej.2016.144
Department(s) Chair Soil Biology and Biological Soil Quality
Laboratory of Nematology
PE&RC
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2017
Abstract Protists are major predators of bacteria in soils. However, it remains unknown how protists sense their prey in this highly complex environment. Here, we investigated whether volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of six phylogenetic distinct soil bacteria affect the performance of three different soil protists and how that relates to direct feeding interactions. We observed that most bacteria affected protist activity by VOCs. However, the response of protists to the VOCs was strongly dependent on both the bacterial and protist interacting partner. Stimulation of protist activity by volatiles and in direct trophic interaction assays often coincided, suggesting that VOCs serve as signals for protists to sense suitable prey. Furthermore, bacterial terpene synthase mutants lost the ability to affect protists, indicating that terpenes represent key components of VOC-mediated communication. Overall, we demonstrate that volatiles are directly involved in protist−bacterial predator−prey interactions.
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