Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 511230
Title Engineering community spirit : the pre-figurative politics of affective citizenship in Dutch local governance
Author(s) Wilde, Mandy de; Duyvendak, Jan Willem
Source Citizenship Studies 20 (2016)8. - ISSN 1362-1025 - p. 973 - 993.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1080/13621025.2016.1229194
Department(s) Environmental Policy
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2016
Keyword(s) Affective citizenship - belonging - community - local governance - pre-figurative politics - sensitising policy techniques - the Netherlands
Abstract

Over the past two decades, communitarian criticisms of the lack of public engagement and a sense of local belonging have inspired extensive debates across Western Europe on how best to govern deprived urban neighbourhoods. One governmental strategy has been to engineer neighbourhood communities as localised, collective spheres of belonging. In this article, we show how ‘governing through affect’ has been part of Dutch neighbourhood policy since the turn of the millennium. Through an in-depth study of a community participation programme in a deprived Amsterdam neighbourhood, we analyse how policy practitioners use ‘sensitising policy techniques’ to enhance social cohesion and encourage communitarian citizenship among neighbourhood residents. Although governments often speak of ‘communities’ as self-evident entities, we argue that communities are better understood as enactments where discourses of neighbourliness, proximity, intimacy and familiarity encourage a localised, collective sense of belonging–a governmental strategy that mimics the ‘pre-figurative’ politics of radical social movements.

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