Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 514757
Title Soil networks become more connected and take up more carbon as nature restoration progresses
Author(s) Morriën, W.E.; Hannula, S.E.; Snoek, L.B.; Helmsing, N.R.; Zweers, Hans; Hollander, M. de; Soto, Raquel Luján; Bouffaud, Marie Lara; Buée, M.; Dimmers, W.J.; Duyts, Henk; Geisen, Stefan; Girlanda, Mariangela; Griffiths, R.I.; Jorgensen, H.B.; Jensen, J.; Plassart, P.; Redecker, Dirk; Schmelz, R.M.; Schmidt, Olaf; Thomson, Bruce C.; Tisserant, Emilie; Uroz, Stephane; Winding, Anne; Bailey, M.J.; Bonkowski, M.; Faber, J.H.; Martin, F.; Lemanceau, Philippe; Boer, W. de; Veen, J.A. van; Putten, W.H. van der
Source Nature Communications 8 (2017). - ISSN 2041-1723 - 10 p.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms14349
Department(s) Laboratory of Nematology
PE&RC
Alterra - Animal ecology
Chair Soil Biology and Biological Soil Quality
EPS
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2017
Abstract Soil organisms have an important role in aboveground community dynamics and ecosystem functioning in terrestrial ecosystems. However, most studies have considered soil biota as a black box or focussed on specific groups, whereas little is known about entire soil networks. Here we show that during the course of nature restoration on abandoned arable land a compositional shift in soil biota, preceded by tightening of the belowground networks, corresponds with enhanced efficiency of carbon uptake. In mid- and long-term abandoned field soil, carbon uptake by fungi increases without an increase in fungal biomass or shift in bacterial-to-fungal ratio. The implication of our findings is that during nature restoration the efficiency of nutrient cycling and carbon uptake can increase by a shift in fungal composition and/or fungal activity. Therefore, we propose that relationships between soil food web structure and carbon cycling in soils need to be reconsidered.
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