Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Record number 520212
Title Data from: "African savanna-forest boundary dynamics: a 20-year study"
Author(s) Cuni-sanchez, Aida; White, Lee J.T.; Calders, K.; Jeffery, Kathryn J.; Abernethy, Katharine; Burt, Andrew; Disney, Mathias; Gilpin, Martin; Gomez-dans, Jose L.; Lewis, Simon L.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.5521/FORESTPLOTS.NET/2016_1
Department(s) Laboratory of Geo-information Science and Remote Sensing
Publication type Dataset
Publication year 2016
Abstract Recent studies show widespread encroachment of forest into savannas with important consequences for the global carbon cycle and land-atmosphere interactions. However, little research has focused on in situ measurements of forest-savanna boundary change over time. Using long-term inventory plots we quantify changes in above-ground biomass (AGB), vegetation structure and biodiversity over 20 years for five vegetation types (savanna, colonising forest or F1, successional monodominant forest or F2, Marantaceae forest or F3 and mixed forest or F4) along a savanna-forest transition of central Gabon, all occurring on similar soils. Additionally, we use novel 3D terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) measurements to assess forest structure differences across the transition. Overall, F1 and F2 forests increased in AGB, mainly as a result of adding stems (recruitment in F1) or increased Basal Area (F2). Some plots of F3 and F4 increased in AGB while some decreased. Changes in biodiversity and species’ dominance were small. After 20 years no plot could be classified as having moved to the next stage in the succession. TLS vertical plant profiles showed very distinctive differences amongst the vegetation types. We highlight two relevant points: (i) as forest colonises, changes in biodiversity are much slower than changes in forest structure or AGB; and (ii) all forest types store important quantities of Carbon. Decades long-term monitoring is likely to be required to assess the speed of transition between vegetation types, ideally with TLS, as this provides more objective forest classifications than inventory monitoring.
Comments
There are no comments yet. You can post the first one!
Post a comment
 
Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.