Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 523970
Title Modulating the gut microbiota by dietary guar gum protects against diet-induced obesity but promotes non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in mice
Author(s) Janssen, Aafke; Houben, Tom; Katiraei, Saeed; Boutens, Lily; Bolt, Nieke van der; Wang, Zeneng; Brown, Jonathan M.; Hazen, Stanley L.; Shiri-Sverdlov, Ronit; Willems van Dijk, Ko; Vervoort, Jacques; Stienstra, Rinke; Hooiveld, Guido; Kersten, Sander
Department(s) Chair Nutrition Metabolism and Genomics
Cell Biology and Immunology
Biochemistry
VLAG
EPS
Publication type Dataset
Publication year 2017
Keyword(s) Mus musculus - GSE76087 - PRJNA306172
Abstract Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is rapidly becoming the most common liver disease worldwide, yet the pathogenesis of NAFLD is only partially understood. Here, we investigated the role of the gut bacteria in NAFLD by stimulating the gut bacteria via feeding mice the fermentable dietary fiber guar gum and suppressing the gut bacteria via chronic oral administration of antibiotics. Guar gum feeding profoundly altered the gut microbiota composition, in parallel with reduced diet-induced obesity and improved glucose tolerance. Strikingly, despite reducing adipose tissue mass and inflammation, guar gum enhanced hepatic inflammation and fibrosis, concurrent with markedly elevated plasma and hepatic bile acid levels. Consistent with a role of elevated bile acids in the liver phenotype, treatment of mice with taurocholic acid stimulated hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. In contrast to guar gum, chronic oral administration of antibiotics effectively suppressed the gut bacteria, decreased portal secondary bile acid levels, and attenuated hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. Neither guar gum or antibiotics influenced plasma lipopolysaccharide levels. In conclusion, our data indicate a causal link between changes in gut microbiota and hepatic inflammation and fibrosis in a mouse model of NAFLD, possibly via alterations in bile acids.
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