Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 524216
Title Habitual diet and diet quality in Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A case-control study
Author(s) Tigchelaar, Ettje F.; Mujagic, Zlatan; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Hesselink, M.; Meijboom, S.; Perenboom, C.W.M.; Masclee, A.A.M.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Feskens, E.J.M.; Jonkers, D.
Source Neurogastroenterology & Motility 29 (2017)12. - ISSN 1365-2982
DOI https://doi.org/10.1111/nmo.13151
Department(s) Global Nutrition
VLAG
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2017
Abstract Background Diet is considered to be a key factor in symptom generation in Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and patients tend to exclude food products from their diet in pursue of symptom relief, which may impair diet quality. Methods We evaluated habitual dietary intake in IBS patients with regard to nutrients and food products using an extensive food frequency questionnaire. One hundred ninety-four IBS patients were compared to 186 healthy controls using multiple logistic regression analysis. An overall diet quality score was calculated for each participant based on the criteria of the Dutch Healthy Diet (DHD) index. Key Results A lower DHD-score was found for IBS (mean [SD]: 52.9 [9.6]) vs controls (55.1 [9.2], P=.02). The diet of patients was lower in fibers (21 g vs 25 g per day, P=.002) and fructose (14 g vs 16 g, P=.033), while higher in total fat (37% vs 36% of total energy intake, P=.010) and added sugars (46 g vs 44 g, P=.029). Differences in daily intake of food products included lower consumption of apples (40 g vs 69 g, P<.001), pasta (28 vs 37 g, P=.029) and alcoholic beverages (130 g vs 193 g, P=.024) and higher consumption of processed meat (38 g vs 29 g, P<.001). Some of these findings correlated with gastrointestinal symptoms, showing differences between IBS subtypes. Conclusions and Inferences Differences in habitual diet were described, showing lower diet quality in IBS patients compared to controls, with increased consumption of fat and lower intake of fibers and fructose. Our data support the importance of personalized and professional nutritional guidance of IBS patients.
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