Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 532004
Title Data from: Artificial night lighting inhibits feeding in moths
Author(s) Langevelde, F. van; Grunsven, R.H.A. van; Veenendaal, E.M.; Fijen, T.P.M.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.5061/dryad.8v212
Department(s) PE&RC
Resource Ecology
Nature Conservation and Plant Ecology
Publication type Dataset
Publication year 2017
Keyword(s) nocturnal light pollution - feeding behaviour - Lepidoptera - moth population declines - sublethal effect
Abstract One major, yet poorly studied, change in the environment is nocturnal light pollution, which strongly alters habitats of nocturnally active species. Artificial night lighting is often considered as driving force behind rapid moth population declines in severely illuminated countries. To understand these declines, the question remains whether artificial light causes only increased mortality or also sublethal effects. We show that moths subjected to artificial night lighting spend less time feeding than moths in darkness, with the shortest time under light conditions rich in short wavelength radiation. These findings provide evidence for sublethal effects contributing to moth population declines. Because effects are strong under various types of light compared with dark conditions, the potential of spectral alterations as a conservation tool may be overestimated. Therefore, restoration and maintenance of darkness in illuminated areas is essential for reversing declines of moth populations.
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