Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 532609
Title Wild, insectivorous bats might be carriers of Campylobacter spp.
Author(s) Hazeleger, Wilma C.; Jacobs-Reitsma, Wilma F.; Lina, Peter H.C.; Boer, Albert G. De; Bosch, Thijs; Hoek, Angela H.A.M. Van; Beumer, Rijkelt R.
Source PLoS One 13 (2018)1. - ISSN 1932-6203
DOI https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0190647
Department(s) Food Microbiology Laboratory
CVI Infection Biology
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2018
Abstract Background The transmission cycles of the foodborne pathogens Campylobacter and Salmonella are not fully elucidated. Knowledge of these cycles may help reduce the transmission of these pathogens to humans. Methodology/principal findings The presence of campylobacters and salmonellas was examined in 631 fresh fecal samples of wild insectivorous bats using a specially developed method for the simultaneous isolation of low numbers of these pathogens in small-sized fecal samples ( 0.1 g). Salmonella was not detected in the feces samples, but thermotolerant campylobacters were confirmed in 3% (n = 17) of the bats examined and these pathogens were found in six different bat species, at different sites, in different ecosystems during the whole flying season of bats. Molecular typing of the 17 isolated strains indicated C. jejuni (n = 9), C. coli (n = 7) and C. lari (n = 1), including genotypes also found in humans, wildlife, environmental samples and poultry. Six strains showed unique sequence types. Conclusion/significance This study shows that insectivorous bats are not only carriers of viral pathogens, but they can also be relevant for the transmission of bacterial pathogens. Bats should be considered as carriers and potential transmitters of Campylobacter and, where possible, contact between bats (bat feces) and food or feed should be avoided.
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