Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Record number 533034
Title Seagrass leaf element content : A global overview
Author(s) Vonk, J.A.; Smulders, Fee O.H.; Christianen, Marjolijn J.A.; Govers, Laura L.
Source Marine Pollution Bulletin (2017). - ISSN 0025-326X
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2017.09.066
Department(s) IMARES Onderzoeksformatie
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2017
Keyword(s) Environmental adaptation - Evolutionary history - Micronutrients - Plant physiology - Seagrass - Successional stage
Abstract Knowledge on the role of seagrass leaf elements and in particular micronutrients and their ranges is limited. We present a global database, consisting of 1126 unique leaf values for ten elements, obtained from literature and unpublished data, spanning 25 different seagrass species from 28 countries. The overall order of average element values in seagrass leaves was Na. >. K. >. Ca. >. Mg. >. S. >. Fe. >. Al. >. Si. >. Mn. >. Zn. Although we observed differences in leaf element content between seagrass families, high intraspecific variation indicated that leaf element content was more strongly determined by environmental factors than by evolutionary history. Early successional species had high leaf Al and Fe content. In addition, seagrass leaf element content also showed correlations with macronutrients (N and P), indicating that productivity also depends on other elements. Expected genomes of additional seagrass species in combination with experiments manipulating (micro)nutrients and environmental drivers might enable us to unravel the importance of various elements to sustain productive and flourishing meadows.
Comments
There are no comments yet. You can post the first one!
Post a comment
 
Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.