Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 533109
Title No Adverse Programming by Post-Weaning Dietary Fructose of Body Weight, Adiposity, Glucose Tolerance, or Metabolic Flexibility
Author(s) Bouwman, Lianne M.S.; Fernández-Calleja, José M.S.; Swarts, Hans J.M.; Stelt, Inge van der; Oosting, Annemarie; Keijer, Jaap; Schothorst, Evert M. van
Source Molecular Nutrition & Food Research 62 (2018)2. - ISSN 1613-4125
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mnfr.201700315
Department(s) Human and Animal Physiology
VLAG
WIAS
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2018
Keyword(s) carbohydrates - indirect calorimetry - metabolic programming - metabolism - monosaccharides
Abstract Scope: Metabolic programming can occur not only in the perinatal period, but also post-weaning. This study aims to assess whether fructose, in comparison to glucose, in the post-weaning diet programs body weight, adiposity, glucose tolerance, metabolic flexibility, and health at adult age. Methods and results: Three-week-old male and female C57BL6/JRccHsd mice are given an intervention diet with 32 energy percent (en%) glucose or fructose for only 3 weeks. Next, all animals are switched to the same 40 en% high fat diet for 9 weeks. Neither body weight nor adiposity differs significantly between the animals fed with glucose or fructose diets at any point during the study in both sexes. Glucose tolerance in adulthood is not affected by the post-weaning diet, nor are activity, energy expenditure, and metabolic flexibility, as measured by indirect calorimetry. At the end of the study, only in females fasting serum insulin levels and HOMA-IR index are lower in post-weaning fructose versus glucose diet (p = 0.02), without differences in pancreatic β-cell mass. Conclusions: Our present findings indicate no adverse programming of body weight, adiposity, glucose tolerance, and metabolic flexibility by dietary (solid) fructose in comparison to glucose in the post-weaning diet in mice.
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