Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 534187
Title Stress and sexual reproduction affect the dynamics of the wheat pathogen effector AvrStb6 and strobilurin resistance
Author(s) Kema, Gerrit H.J.; Mirzadi Gohari, Amir; Aouini, Lamia; Gibriel, Hesham A.Y.; Ware, Sarah B.; Den Bosch, Frank van; Manning-Smith, Robbie; Alonso-Chavez, Vasthi; Helps, Joe; M’Barek, Sarrah Ben; Mehrabi, Rahim; Diaz-Trujillo, Caucasella; Zamani, Elham; Schouten, Henk J.; Lee, Theo A.J. van der; Waalwijk, Cees; Waard, Maarten A. de; Wit, Pierre J.G.M. de; Verstappen, Els C.P.; Thomma, Bart P.H.J.; Meijer, Harold J.G.; Seidl, Michael F.
Source Nature Genetics 50 (2018). - ISSN 1061-4036 - p. 375 - 380.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41588-018-0052-9
Department(s) Laboratory of Phytopathology
EPS
PPO/PRI Biointeractions and Plant Health
WUR PB Biodiversiteit en Genetische Variatie
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2018
Abstract Host resistance and fungicide treatments are cornerstones of plant-disease control. Here, we show that these treatments allow sex and modulate parenthood in the fungal wheat pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici. We demonstrate that the Z. tritici–wheat interaction complies with the gene-for-gene model by identifying the effector AvrStb6, which is recognized by the wheat resistance protein Stb6. Recognition triggers host resistance, thus implying removal of avirulent strains from pathogen populations. However, Z. tritici crosses on wheat show that sex occurs even with an avirulent parent, and avirulence alleles are thereby retained in subsequent populations. Crossing fungicide-sensitive and fungicide-resistant isolates under fungicide pressure results in a rapid increase in resistance-allele frequency. Isolates under selection always act as male donors, and thus disease control modulates parenthood. Modeling these observations for agricultural and natural environments reveals extended durability of host resistance and rapid emergence of fungicide resistance. Therefore, fungal sex has major implications for disease control.
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