Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 534397
Title Declines in moth populations stress the need for conserving dark nights
Author(s) Langevelde, Frank van; Braamburg-Annegarn, Marijke; Huigens, Martinus E.; Groendijk, Rob; Poitevin, Olivier; Deijk, Jurriën R. van; Ellis, Willem N.; Grunsven, Roy H.A. van; Vos, Rob de; Vos, Rutger A.; Franzén, Markus; WallisDeVries, Michiel F.
Source Global Change Biology 24 (2018)3. - ISSN 1354-1013 - p. 925 - 932.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.14008
Department(s) PE&RC
Resource Ecology
Nature Conservation and Plant Ecology
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2018
Keyword(s) artificial light at night - ecological traits - ecology of the night - Lepidoptera - light pollution - phototaxis
Abstract Given the global continuous rise, artificial light at night is often considered a driving force behind moth population declines. Although negative effects on individuals have been shown, there is no evidence for effects on population sizes to date. Therefore, we compared population trends of Dutch macromoth fauna over the period 1985–2015 between moth species that differ in phototaxis and adult circadian rhythm. We found that moth species that show positive phototaxis or are nocturnally active have stronger negative population trends than species that are not attracted to light or are diurnal species. Our results indicate that artificial light at night is an important factor in explaining declines in moth populations in regions with high artificial night sky brightness. Our study supports efforts to reduce the impacts of artificial light at night by promoting lamps that do not attract insects and reduce overall levels of illumination in rural areas to reverse declines of moth populations.
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