Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 534533
Title Lost in diversity: the interactions between soil-borne fungi, biodiversity and plant productivity
Author(s) Mommer, L.; Cotton, Anne; Raaijmakers, J.M.; Termorshuizen, A.J.; Ruijven, J. van; Hendriks, Marloes; Rijssel, Sophie van; Mortel, J.E. van de; Paauw, J.W.M. van der; Schijlen, E.G.W.M.; Smit-Tiekstra, Annemiek; Berendse, F.; Kroon, Hans de; Dumbrell, A.J.
Source New Phytologist 218 (2018)2. - ISSN 0028-646X - p. 542 - 553.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/nph.15036
Department(s) Nature Conservation and Plant Ecology
PE&RC
PRI BIOS Applied Bioinformatics
WIMEK
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2018
Abstract There is consensus that plant species richness enhances plant productivity within natural grasslands, but the underlying drivers remain debated. Recently, differential accumulation of soil-borne fungal pathogens across the plant diversity gradient has been proposed as a cause of this pattern. However, the below-ground environment has generally been treated as a 'black box' in biodiversity experiments, leaving these fungi unidentified. Using next generation sequencing and pathogenicity assays, we analysed the community composition of root-associated fungi from a biodiversity experiment to examine if evidence exists for host specificity and negative density dependence in the interplay between soil-borne fungi, plant diversity and productivity. Plant species were colonised by distinct (pathogenic) fungal communities and isolated fungal species showed negative, species-specific effects on plant growth. Moreover, 57% of the pathogenic fungal operational taxonomic units (OTUs) recorded in plant monocultures were not detected in eight plant species plots, suggesting a loss of pathogenic OTUs with plant diversity. Our work provides strong evidence for host specificity and negative density-dependent effects of root-associated fungi on plant species in grasslands. Our work substantiates the hypothesis that fungal root pathogens are an important driver of biodiversity-ecosystem functioning relationships.
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